JR/SR HIGH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

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Christian Jr/Sr High School Course Catalog

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Course TitleDepartmentGrade LevelCourse DescriptionTextbook
The Story of GodBible9thThe Story of God is a year-long survey course which investigates God’s story as it has been revealed through the Bible. With the aim of knowing and loving God and demonstrating that love for other people, students read and examine Scripture, explore its context, and study key passages. Using the Bible as the textbook, students read Israel’s narrative history chronologically in the Old Testament. With the basic knowledge of the Old Testament as a foundation, students then build on this foundation of knowledge by reading and studying the life of Christ and the beginning of the Church in the New Testament. Students finish this course by examining selections from the epistles and Revelation.The Bible
The Life of ChristBible10thThe Life of Christ is a year-long study of the life of Jesus Christ centered around the four Gospels. With the aim of knowing and loving God and demonstrating that love for other people, students will read and examine the ministry of Jesus Christ through a harmony of the Gospels approach. Students will explore the early 1st century Jewish culture to better understand the settings and meanings to translate the truth recorded into their lives today. Students will study the teachings, miracles, and example of Jesus Christ throughout His life.The Bible
Christian Doctrine/TheologyBible11thDuring the school year, students will be taking an in-depth study of the Bible and using it as our authority when examining the revelation of God and major Christian Doctrines. The following doctrines will be discussed throughout the school year: Bibliology, Theology Proper, Christology, Pneumatology, Anthropology, Hamartiology, Soteriology, Ecclesiology and Eschatology. The purpose of the course is to disciple the students so they will have a better understanding of the Christian faith. The hope is for the students to own their faith, understand their God-given purpose so ultimately they be confident in their ability to share and defend their faith with others.The Bible, Christian Beliefs: Twenty Basics Every Christian Should Know by Wayne Grudem, ed. by Elliot Grudem (Zondervan, 2005)
World ReligionsBible12th1st Semester – We will study several different world religions including Buddhism, Islam, Mormonism, the Watchtower Society (Jehovah’s Witnesses), Judaism, and Hinduism. Each of these world religions will be critically examined including their founder(s), their beliefs, and their history along with current events that relate to each world religions. The students will establish methods of evaluating these world religions so they can objectively prove they are not true. Each world religion will be contrasted with Scripture from an objective perspective to demonstrate the truth of the Bible and the false beliefs of these opposing world religions. We will also be covering epistemology/logic, the claim from Islam and Mormons that the Bible has been changed from when it was originally written, and evidence from archaeology regarding the Bible’s reliability. We will evaluate what makes a good translation and contrast the JWs view of the Trinity and the nature of Christ with the Biblical teachings.The Bible, World Religions/Apologetics Reader (relevant articles and original source documents)
ApologeticsBible12th2nd Semester – We will study the Biblical view of origins (creation/intelligent design), the Darwinian theory of evolution, God’s perspective of homosexuality, the role of Christians in government (Separation of Church and State?), Abortion, the Bible’s view of dating and marriage, and how we can know that the Bible is actually God’s Word. We will examine various opposing views/attacks against the Bible including supposed contradictions, the idea the Bible has been changed over time, and others. We will discuss how to own and defend our faith within and outside the Christian community, especially focusing on the difficult questions students will be presented with in secular universities and the media.The Bible, World Religions/Apologetics Reader (relevant articles and original source documents)
Bible 7- Old Testament and ChristianBible7th7th grade Bible is divided into two very different semesters. The first semester engages the student in an overview of the Old Testament. Students will study the most significant themes, persons, and events using their Bibles and other teacher-provided resources. The second semester introduces students to the basic disciplines of the Christian life using the textbook Dynamic Christian Living. Lessons include such topics as assurance of salvation, the importance of prayer, witnessing, and depending upon God’s promises. In addition, students will sharpen their reasoning and thinking skills all year long in the textThe Thinking Toolbox.
Bible 8Bible8thThe Life of Christ is our textbook for the first semester. This is an in-depth look at Jesus through the eyes of John the Apostle. The second semester offers many topics to students such as missions, world religions, the persecuted church, and how to develop a personal testimony. In addition, 8th graders will sharpen their reasoning and thinking skills as they work through the textbook The Art of Argument.
Family and Consumer Science-On Your OwnElectives9th-12thThe goal of this class is to teach Biblically sound, introductory independent living skills as they relate to home safety, child development, decision making, money management, clothing care and nutrition. Specific skills sets for sewing and food prep are the hands-on components, giving students the opportunity for self discovery, and teaching them how to operate a sewing machine and prepare food in the kitchen. This includes promoting growth in personal stewardship and management for application in home, family and social life, as well as the church and workplace, all for the purpose of engaging Spiritual growth to influence others for Christ. The Family and Consumer Sciences electives are designed to teach practical skills usable now and in a student’s future, with the goal of being good stewards of what God has given, pleasing Him in all we do.Building Life Skills (Goodheart-Willcox)
Family and Consumer Science- Financial PeaceElectives9th-12thThe goal of this course is to empower students with knowledge and application of basic financial principles so that they can make sound financial decisions for life.Foundations in Personal Finance, High School Edition, Ramsey
Academic Support-Study SkillsElectives9th-12thThe Study Skills Class is designed to come alongside students and provide the necessary study skills to enable the students to independently succeed academically. The course is designed to support academic achievement by developing skills in the following areas: time management, organization, maintaining an assignment notebook, note-taking, outlining and summarizing, writing, and reading comprehension.
Digital Video ProductionElectives9th-12thThe students use their own creative ideas to create several short films each semester. In addition, the instructor assigns individual video projects, as well as group projects, in order for the students to better understand how to make successful short films. In this course, the students complete at least three individual projects each semester.
Advanced Video ProductionElectives9th-12thStudents will use their own creative ideas to create several short films each semester. In addition, the instructor creates groups within the class who are assigned various chapel projects during the year based on various subject areas. The students create, and assist in creating, other video projects on campus.
STEM- Introduction to Engineering DesignElectives9th-12thPrerequisite: Algebra I or concurrently enrolled in Algebra I, Students dig deep into the engineering design process, applying math, science, and engineering standards to hands-on projects like designing a new product or improving an existing product using innovative software programs and 3D printers.
Woodshop IElectives9th-12thWoodworking is a course designed to introduce students to general woodworking practices. Students will gain knowledge and experience through various projects, demonstrations, classroom presentations and research on their own. Students will be expected to learn about and safely use hand tools, power tools and woodworking machinery. The projects will be designed to give students a building, progressive experience to acquaint the learner with a wide range of woodworking techniques and tools.
Woodshop IIElectives9th-12thWoodworking II is a course designed to cultivate woodworking skills for students who have completed the introductory course and wish to attempt more sophisticated projects. Students will build upon knowledge gained in Woodshop level I to be able to move on to building furniture quality projects, especially with hardwoods. After a review of safety information, each student will be asked to demonstrate their skills on the machinery to certify their safe operation of each tool. Students will then be asked to take some initiative in designing projects that have piqued their interest and which will continue allowing them to develop their woodworking skills.
7th Grade Rotation- Home EconomicsElectives7thThis elective course is a hands-on, project oriented class. It is divided into home safety and kids, clothing care, sewing, and foods. Areas covered range from home accident prevention, emergency preparedness, child development, clothing maintenance, DIY projects, basic food nutrition, and food preparation
7th Grade Rotation-KeyboardingElectives7thThis is a 9-week course This course satisfies the High School keyboarding requirement The course description for this course is under review.
7th Grade Rotation- WoodshopElectives7thThe woodshop survey course is designed to introduce students to the world of woodworking. It is intended to acquaint the student with the curriculum , skills and machinery one might encounter in the year long course offered as Woodshop I. This course might best be described as “a taste of Woodshop” and will allow students to make an informed choice when presented with the opportunity next year to sign up for the first real woodshop course. This course is a part of a “wheel” of four courses for seventh grade students which will last for nine weeks.
Music-JH Band- 1 year courseElectives7th-8thYear-Long Elective Pre-Requisite: The student must play an instrument or take lessons in the summer. Level placement in Cadet/Crusader Band based on teacher recommendation. Class fee: $225 Cadet Band: This course is designed for the beginning/intermediate instrumentalist. It includes basic musical foundations and a well-rounded band experience. This is a performing group. Crusader Band: This course is designed for the intermediate/advanced instrumentalist. It includes more advanced theory, well-rounded band experience while expanding expertise on the individual instrument and exposure to various styles of music. This is a performing group.
Music – JH Choir – 1 year courseElectives7th-8thThis is a year-long elective Choir is a performance-oriented class designed to provide the singer basic training in music theory, vocal production, and performance proficiency through concert experiences.
8th Grade Spanish – 1 year courseElectives8thStudents will develop skills in the four aspects of language: Listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing on a beginner level. Students will do group work, partner work and individual work to develop their Spanish skills as thematic vocabulary and grammar concepts are taught. The Present and Preterit Tenses are the focus of the grammar units whereas a variety of vocabulary is presented. The Hispanic culture and civilizations are also taught through selected readings, videos, and discussions.Descubre I (Vista Higher Learning)
8th grade Drama – 1 semester elective – alternates with 8th grade ArtElectives8thEighth grade Drama introduces students to an overview of acting and performance techniques. Students learn basic theater vocabulary, acting styles, and memorization techniques while focusing on creative movement, voice control, and character development. The semester class ends in a class play performed for parents.
8th grade Digital Video – 1 year courseElectives8thThe students will use their own creative ideas to create several short films. In addition, the instructor will assign individual video projects, as well as group projects, so that the students can better understand how to make successful short films. In this course, the students will complete at least three individual projects during each semester.
English 1English9thThis class provides a more in-depth study of literature and writing through the rhetorical approach and builds on the student’s acknowledged interest in the language arts. Students are encouraged to participate in meaningful class discussions and writing assignments. Additionally, a goal is set for students to read and analyze a variety of literary genres and learn to write critically while embracing the bible as the source of truth. Knowledge of the English language and literature will prepare the students to succeed academically and to think critically as followers of Christ, recognizing that all knowledge must be filtered through the lens of God’s Word.All Quiet on the Western Front, The Odyssey, Pilgrim’s Progress, Romeo and Juliet,, The Chosen, Prentice Hall Literature: Timeless voices, Timeless Themes, Short Story Anthology, Poetry Anthology, The Most Dangerous Game,To Build A Fire, The Scarlet Ibis, Antigone, Hercules, Confessions
English 1 HonorsEnglish9thAn overview of World literature provides a more in-depth study of literature and writing through the rhetorical approach and builds on the student’s acknowledged interest in the language arts. Students are encouraged to participate in meaningful class discussions and writing assignments. Additionally, a goal is set for students to read and analyze a variety of literary genres and learn to write critically while embracing the bible as the source of truth. Knowledge of the English language and literature will prepare the students to succeed academically and to think critically as followers of Christ, recognizing that all knowledge must be filtered through the lens of God’s Word.Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes: Gold, Prentice Hall, 2002; The Bible. The Odyssey, Homer; Pilgrim’s Progress, Bunyan; Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare; Antigone, Sophocles; The Chosen, Potok; Confessions, Augustine; Introduction to Mythology, Hamilton. All Quiet on the Western Front, Erich Maria Remarque; Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, Stevenson. Required reading and writing projects are due the first school day of the fall semester.
English IIEnglish10thEnglish II emphasizes the analysis and interpretation of world literature, specifically European works. Selected novels, plays, and short story anthologies will be read and analyzed. The writing process will be used in both informal literary responses as well as formal academic essays. Both verbal and written communication skills will be practiced. Vocabulary words will be selected directly from the literature being read as well as various literary terms as per language arts standards. Socratic Seminars will be held regularly to further develop cognitive and rhetorical skills.Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes: Platinum, Prentice Hall, 2002; The Bible. Frankenstein, Mary Shelley; Hamlet, William Shakespeare; Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens; Animal Farm, George Orwell; To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee. Lord of the Flies, William Golding. Required reading and writing projects are due the first school day of the fall semester.
English II HonorsEnglish10thHonors English II emphasizes the analysis and interpretation of world literature, specifically European works. Selected novels, plays, and short story anthologies will be read and analyzed. The writing process will be used in both informal literary responses as well as formal academic essays. Both verbal and written communication skills will be practiced. Vocabulary words will be selected directly from the literature being read as well as various literary terms as per language arts standards. Socratic Seminars will be held regularly to further develop cognitive and rhetorical skills Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes: Platinum, Prentice Hall, 2002; The Bible. Frankenstein, Mary Shelley; Hamlet, William Shakespeare; Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens; Animal Farm, George Orwell; To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee.: Screwtape Letters, C. S. Lewis; Life of Pi, Yann Martel Lord of the Flies, William Golding. Cry, Thy Beloved Country, Alan Paton. Required reading and writing projects are due the first school day of the fall semester.
English IIIEnglish11thEnglish III is a systematic study of America’s literary achievement from the earliest Puritan writers to more contemporary authors. Emphasis is placed upon honing writing skills, analyzing literary pieces, and participating in meaningful class discussions.Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes: The American Experience, Prentice Hall; 2002 The Bible. The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorn; The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain; The Crucible, Arthur Miller; The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald; Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury; Various short stories and poems. The Old Man and the Sea, by Ernest Hemingway and The Pearl, John Steinbeck. Required reading and writing projects are due the first school day of the fall semester.
English III HonorsEnglish11thThe course is a cursory view of American literature in fiction, poetry, drama, political writing, biographies and sermons. Students will explore the inception of these genres and follow them through chronologically as the United States of America develops. A biblical and historical integration will help students interpret life issues, and cultural influence. Analysis, critical thinking, collaboration, communication, and creativity will be utilized. Socratic Seminars and rhetorical writing are core components. Students will be responsible for rhetorical arguments in an essay upon completion of each unit.Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes: The American Experience, Prentice Hall; 2002 The Bible. The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne; The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain; The Crucible, Arthur Miller; The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald; The Power of Sympathy, William Brown. The Old Man and the Sea, by Ernest Hemingway, The Pearl, John Steinbeck and Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury. Required reading and writing projects are due the first school day of the fall semester.
English IVEnglish12thAn overview of British literature is taught beginning with an introduction to language and the Anglo-Saxon literature, continuing through the Twenty-first century. Eight major works along with poetry anthologies are read and lives of important authors are studied. Emphasis is given to the development of the English language as it relates to each period of literary works. The class is structured so that all the works are presented in a chronological order showing a strong relationship between literary trends of the day and the historical developments. Social issues, political movements, and religious influences are all catalysts for the literature of the time period.The British Tradition Timeless Voices, Timeless, Prentice Hall Literature; Themes, published 2002; The Bible. Beowulf, Anonymous; Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer; Tragedy of Macbeth, William Shakespeare; Paradise Lost, John Milton; Gulliver’s Travels, Jonathan Swift; Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen; The Great Divorce, C.S. Lewis. Heart of Darkness, by Joseph Conrad. Required reading and writing projects are due the first school day of the fall semester.
AP English Literature and CompositionEnglish12thAn overview of British literature is taught beginning with an introduction to language and the Anglo-Saxon literature, continuing through the Twenty-first century. Eight major works along with poetry anthologies are read and lives of important authors are studied. Emphasis is given to the development of the English language as it relates to each period of literary works. The class is structured so that all the works are presented in a chronological order showing a strong relationship between literary trends of the day and the historical developments. Social issues, political movements, and religious influences are all catalysts for the literature of the time period. AP students will use their writing to help improve their ability to understand issues and texts. They will also read critically and analytically and develop their own writer’s voice. As they engage with the texts, they will see the relationship between various writings and how they relate to their own experiences. Students will also develop a repertoire of rewriting and rhetorical strategies, learn how to develop an argumentative thesis, master various research techniques, become proficient in developing a research paper, and monitor their writing for correct use of grammar and punctuation.The British Tradition Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes; Prentice Hall Literature, published 2002; The Bible; Prentice Hall World Masterpieces published 1991; Allan Casson-Cliff’s AP English Literature and Composition ; in-class handouts; Norton Anthology to Literature, 4th Edition. Beowulf, Anonymous; Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer; Tragedy of Macbeth, William Shakespeare; Paradise Lost, John Milton; Gulliver’s Travels, Jonathan Swift; Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen; The Great Divorce, C.S. Lewis. Heart of Darkness, Conrad, Jane Eyre, Bronte, The Importance of Being Earnest, Wilde. Required reading and writing projects are due the first school day of the fall semester.
English 7 and Advanced English 7English7thThis course parallels the time period covered in the British and U.S. from mid-eighteenth century and focuses on the “Quest” theme. One’s purpose and identity is evaluated through the works. Eight parts of speech, Schaffer’s 5-paragraph structure, the writing process (outline, pre-draft, edit, and publish) with MLA formatting, figurative language, vocabulary (context words) and spelling are included in this course.
English 8English8thThe time period in U.S. history covered in this English class is from Reconstruction to present day and focuses on the “Warfare” theme. The eight parts of speech, Schaffer’s 5-paragraph essay, the writing process (outline, pre-draft, writing, editing, and publishing), figurative language, and emphasis on vocabulary and spelling are all part of this course.Prentice Hall Literature: Silver, Prentice Hall, Grammar for Writing: Level Yellow, Sadlier, Bible, The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane, Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain, The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank, Silas Marner by George Eliot, and Gifted Hands by Ben Carson, Swiss Family Robinson, by Johann David Wyss
English 8- AdvancedEnglish8thThis course parallels the time period covered in U.S. history from Reconstruction to present day and focuses on the “Warfare” theme. The eight parts of speech, Schaffer’s 5 paragraph essay, the writing process (outline, pre-draft, writing, editing, and publishing), figurative language, and emphasis on vocabulary and spelling are all part of this course. This class moves at a faster pace than standard English 8 with additional reading and writing assignments.Prentice Hall Literature: Silver, Prentice Hall, Grammar for Writing: Level Yellow, Sadlier, The Bible, The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane, Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain, The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank, Silas Marner by George Eliot, Gifted Hands by Ben Carson, My Antonia, by Willa Cather and The Giver, by Lois Lowry, Swiss Family Robinson, by Johann David Wyss
High School English (ESL II)ESL9th & 10thThis two-semester course is designed for beginner ESL students usually in grades 9 and 10. It covers listening, speaking, grammar, and vocabulary development. The course with one year of ESL Lab and one year of English American History is designed to fulfill one year college-prep English requirement. Students completing this course usually proceed to the intermediate level (ESL III)
High School English (ESL III)ESL9-12This two-semester course is designed for intermediate students in grades 9-11. It covers listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in the content area of English. The course with one year of English Lab is designed to fulfill one year, college-prep English requirement. Students completing this course should be able to succeed (in varying degrees) in regular English 9 and Advanced English.
English Reading Writing and Advanced Grammar (ESL IV)ESL9-12This two-semester course is designed for advanced students in grades 9-12. It covers listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in the content area of English. This course is designed to fulfill one year, college-prep, English requirement. It is also designed to be used as an elective for students in mainstreamed English classes who need additional English as identified by the SLEP test. Students who complete this course should be able to succeed in most mainstreamed classes in grades 9-11.
English American History for Content and 254 Sheltered US History/GeographyESL9-12The lessons in these two levels of US History form the foundation for understanding US History and Government. The lessons include spiritual heritage interwoven throughout the text and activities. Students are challenged to compare world events, moral and ethical issues and historical decisions with Scripture.
Sheltered Bible I and II ESL9th, 10th, 11th, 12thThe Bible is the text, and these two classes lay the foundation for understanding the Way, the Truth and the Life. Old Testament survey is presented in Bible I. Students are taught God’s promises and the fulfillment of prophecy in Christ’s birth, death, and resurrection, including with creation, Jewish history, the prophets, the Exile and the Promised Land. Bible II challenges the thinking through topical studies, memory verses, and DICE exercises (Define, Inquire, Content and Emphasis) to analyze and make personal application of scripture. The teaching of the gospels with special emphasis in the book of Mark as well as discussion of issues is the focus of this class.
ESL LabESL9th, 10th, 11th, 12thThe Lab is an individualized, computer-enhanced approaches designed to improve basic skills and for SAT, ACT and TOEFL preparation.
Introduction to PhotographyFine Arts9th, 10th, 11th, 12thIntroduction to Photography is a non-darkroom course that introduces students to basic camera function and care, an introduction to using Photoshop to edit and enhance photos, and create “digital art.”
Drama IFine Arts9th, 10th, 11th, 12thDrama I is an introductory class exploring many aspects of theatre. Students are given an overview of set-building, properties, costumes, and stage make-up. Basic theatre history and beginning acting skills will also be learned. Each student performs in a scene/ monologue showcase and/or one-act play.
Drama IIFine Arts9th, 10th, 11th, 12thStudents in this class will present several major productions during the year. Class time is spent in rehearsal and preparation for these productions. Class enrollment is by audition.
Art IFine Arts9th, 10th, 11th, 12thThis is an introductory art elective that offers a variety of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional experiences. Students develop observation and technical skills in drawing, painting, design, printmaking, and sculpture while developing confidence in creative and visual expression. With an emphasis on studio production, this course is designed to develop art appreciation, higher-level thinking and problem solving, art-related technology skills, art criticism, art history, and aesthetics. This basic art course presents a core of knowledge essential to all other art classes.
Art IIFine Arts9th, 10th, 11th, 12thThis is an advanced art course designed for further development and exploration of a range of media, techniques, and processes in drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, and design. Through this course students will explore creative thinking that reflects complex concepts, as well as develop confidence and risk-taking abilities in the visual expression of their ideas. They develop competencies and skills in problem solving, communication, and management of time and resources that contribute to lifelong learning and career skills.
AP Studio ArtFine Arts9th, 10th, 11th, 12thThis course is designed as a studio art class taught at the college level. Every aspect of the class will require students to respond at a higher level of responsibility, artistic expression, and sophistication. Students will have an understanding that their work will demonstrate a sense of relevance based upon individual style, technique, and ideation. Students will expand their art skills and experience as they prepare a three-part portfolio for the Advanced Placement Studio Art Program as outlined by the College Board requirements.
ChoirFine Arts9th, 10th, 11th, 12thChoir is a performance-oriented class designed to provide the singer basic training in music theory, vocal production, and performance proficiency through concert experiences.
Vocal Ensemble/Patriot PraiseFine Arts9th, 10th, 11th, 12thVocal Ensemble is an intermediate/advanced level class designed to develop students’ music theory knowledge and skills, to study and practice a wide range of vocal music, to learn and experience leadership, and to provide opportunities for performance proficiency. Students will become skilled at musical notation and sight-reading. They will develop vocal/instrumental skills and establish criteria to evaluate music through critical listening. The Vocal Ensemble is responsible for designing and leading chapel music each week for the whole student body and for performing with the Choir at all performances during the year. Requires audition, application and recommendation.
Concert Band/Marching BandFine Arts9th, 10th, 11th, 12thThis band consists of instrumentalists at intermediate- to-advanced playing ability, performing as a group. First semester, the marching band competes and performs in local parades and field competitions. Second semester, the concert band is adjudicated and performs in various venues.
Symphonic EnsembleFine Arts9th, 10th, 11th, 12thThis is a performance-oriented class for advanced music students who are serious musicians. This group performs symphonic and chamber music. Music theory is incorporated into this class. Advanced students have the opportunity to write original compositions and have them performed by this and other Christian High School performing groups.
Jazz BandFine Arts9th, 10th, 11th, 12thStudents perform different styles of jazz music as well as explore the art of improvisation. This group is adjudicated during the second semester.
Spanish IForeign Language9thThis Spanish course introduces foundational vocabulary and grammar concepts to students. The present and preterit tense are both taught as well as elementary fundamentals of Spanish grammar including: gender and number of nouns, articles, and object pronouns. Students will develop skills in the four aspects of language: Listening Comprehension, Speaking, Reading, and Writing on an introductory level. The Hispanic culture is also taught through selected readings, videos, and discussions.Descubre Level I, Vista Higher Learning, 2011
Spanish IIForeign Language10thThis is an intermediate-level Spanish course building on the concepts and vocabulary taught in our level I course. The Subjunctive and The Perfect Tenses are the focus of the grammar units in our level II course. Students will develop skills in the four aspects of language: Listening Comprehension, Speaking, Reading, and Writing on an intermediate level. The Hispanic culture is also taught through selected readings, videos, and discussions.Descubre Level II, Vista Higher Learning, 2011
Spanish III HonorsForeign Language11thThis is an advanced-level Spanish course utilizing all the concepts and vocabulary from our level I and II courses, with additional vocabulary being introduced and grammar concepts being refined. Conversation and writing are emphasized and reinforced through daily usage in class and outside the classroom. Further study of the Hispanic culture is gained through various media and activities.Descubre Level III, Vista Higher Learning, 2011
AP Spanish Language and CultureForeign Language12thThe AP Spanish Language course is instructed exclusively in Spanish. Students are expected and encouraged to use their Spanish throughout their daily interactions in and out of the classroom to enable them to implement the foundations of language created in the past three years of Spanish study. This course is taught around themes that will help in understanding the culture and language at a real world level.Triángulo Aprobado Wayside Publishing, 2011; AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam Preparation, Vista Higher Learning, 2014; Temas, Vista Higher Learning, 2014
Pre-Modern World History, Beginnings to c. 1492History9thThis course is to expose students to a wide knowledge-base of Pre-Modern World History, and to develop the skills necessary for them to be able to comprehend, analyze, evaluate, interpret, and synthesize historical documents. Students will be expected to understand and analyze the historical context of key events, peoples, places, and legacies in early World History (Beginnings-c. 1492) and relate them to a wider global context. This will be accomplished through direct instruction, reading of texts including primary and secondary sources, interaction with peers through seminars and projects, and by directed and independent writing assignments. Students will be exposed to historical documents which highlight the interactions between humans and the environment, the development of civilizations, the cooperation and conflicts between cultures, the establishment of empires (development, expansion, and decline), the changes and continuities in social structures, and the enduring legacies still impacting the world. Students will also incorporate habits of mind by using historical evidence to do the following: employ chronological reasoning, adeptly compare civilizations, contextualize information, appropriately interpret primary and secondary sources, and arrive to meaningful and persuasive conclusions.World History: Patterns of Interaction. McDougall Littell, 2007.
World History-c. 1492 to PresentHistory9thThis course is to expose students to a wide knowledge-base of Modern World History, and to develop the skills necessary for them to be able to comprehend, analyze, evaluate, interpret, and synthesize historical documents. Students will be expected to understand and analyze the historical context of key events, peoples, places, and legacies in modern World History (1492-Present) and relate them to a wider global context. This will be accomplished through direct instruction, reading of texts including primary and secondary sources, interaction with peers through seminars and projects, and by directed and independent writing assignments. Students will be exposed to historical documents which highlight the interactions between humans and the environment, the development of civilizations, the cooperation and conflicts between cultures, the establishment of empires (development, expansion, and decline), the changes and continuities in social structures, and the enduring legacies still impacting the world. Students will also incorporate habits of mind by using historical evidence to do the following: employ chronological reasoning, adeptly compare civilizations, contextualize information, appropriately interpret primary and secondary sources, and arrive to meaningful and persuasive conclusions.World Civilizations: The Global Experience, 6th ed. Pearson Longman, 2010.
AP World HistoryHistory10thThis college level course is a macro history course which studies the major developments globally from its beginnings to the present, with an emphasis on the key themes of interaction between humans and the environment, development and interaction of cultures, state building, economic systems, and social systems. Special focus is placed on comparing, contrasting, and looking at change over time of civilizations in relation to social, technological, cultural, religious, and political aspects. This class is designed to provide students with the ability to think critically, globally, and provide a Biblical worldview in relation to international issues which have and continue to affect history. The course prepares students to take the AP Exam in the spring by making global connections, developing writing skills, and analyzing primary sources.World History: Patterns of Interaction. McDougall Littell, 2007.
United States History- c. 1600 to 1947History10thStudents in grade eleven study the major turning points in American history from 1492 to 1946. Following a review of the nation’s beginnings and the impact of the Enlightenment and Reformation on U.S. democratic and religious ideals, students build upon the tenth grade study of global industrialization to understand the emergence and impact of new technology and a corporate economy, including the social and cultural effects. They trace the change in the ethnic composition of American society; the movement toward equal rights for racial minorities and women; and the growth of the United States as a major world power. An emphasis is placed on the expanding role of the federal government and federal courts as well as the continuing tension between the individual and the state. Students consider the major social problems of our time and trace their causes in historical events. They learn that the United States has served as a model for other nations and that the rights and freedoms we enjoy are not accidents, but the results of a defined set of political principles that are not always basic to citizens of other countries. Students understand that our rights under the U.S. Constitution are a precious inheritance from God that depends on an educated citizenry for their preservation and protection.The American Journey: A History of the United States, Pearson, 2011.
AP United States HistoryHistory11thThis college-level U.S. history survey course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to form a better understanding of American history from its beginnings to the present. It will teach students to assess evidence and interpretations in historical documents. Through analysis, students will be able to develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of informed judgment and persuasively present ideas in writing. While the course’s content is determined by the College Board, U.S. History is also presented through a Biblical worldview. Also, the course is intended to provide students with the historical practices necessary to prepare for the AP Exam in the spring.Out of Many: A History of the American People. AP Edition, 7th ed. Prentice Hall, 2007.
US GovernmentHistory11thThis one-semester course incorporates elements of basic political science, sociology, and world events into a comprehensive study of the U.S. Constitution. Students will analyze the roots of American democracy and discuss how the ideals and principles of the United States have developed and changed over time. Students will also examine state and local governments and address issues relevant to southern California. Students will learn the philosophy, power structure, and processes related to American Federalism that have shaped and continue to shape the American political experience. Students will learn the separation of powers in the United States government and how the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial branches operate. In addition, students will be exposed to current social issues and evaluate and analyze their significance, as well as consider their own personal beliefs and values. MacGruder’s American Government, Prentice Hall, 2004.
Contemporary US History-c. 1947-PresentHistory12thThis course will begin with the events that shaped the United States as a global power in the early Twentieth Century in order to provide an appropriate context to understand contemporary United States History. Students will study significant historical events, leaders, policies, social movements, and conflicts that have shaped present day America. Students will utilize critical thinking skills, analyze texts, form key arguments, and make connections in regard to important advancements and transformations in the fabric of American society. The course will cover key topics such as the Cold War, the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights Movement, the social and cultural movements of the sixties and seventies, contemporary politics, and the nation’s role in world affairs. By the conclusion of the course, students should be able to trace America’s role in global affairs from the beginning of the Twentieth Century to present day, citing significant changes and advancements.Selected primary and secondary sources are used throughout the course.
AP US Government and PoliticsHistory12thThis year long college level course involves a quarter of Contemporary US History and three quarters of AP Government. It contains both the study of general concepts used to interpret United States politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute United States political reality. This class is designed to establish a foundation for students to better understand the American political system. During the course students will be asked to master key concepts as well as develop a strong political science vocabulary. Students will implement the skills necessary to analyze and synthesize information to arrive at logical, well thought out conclusions from a Biblical worldview. One of the primary goals, aside from preparing for the AP exam, is to motivate student involvement in their government.United States History – Preparing for the Advanced Placement Examination: AMSCO 2018.
US History 7-1492 to ReconstructionHistory7thThis course focuses on early American history through the Reconstruction era following the Civil War. Events are taught chronologically and include, but are not limited to, early exploration and colonization, the American Revolution, The Mexican-American War, Manifest Destiny, the Civil War and Reconstruction, closing of the frontier, and beginnings of industrialization. Special emphases include civics and California history.The American Journey: Glencoe, 2012
US History 8History8thUnited States History, Reconstruction to Present, This course focuses on the turn of the 20th century following the Reconstruction Era of American history through the present time. Events and peoples are examined chronologically and include, but are not limited to, the closing of the West, the Progressive Era, World War I, the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression and New Deal, World War II, beginnings of the Cold War and postwar America, Korean War, the turbulent sixties, Vietnam War, the Reagan era, America as the sole super power following the Cold War, to our current times. Special emphases will include changes in civics and economics.The American Journey, Glencoe, 2012
Pre-AlgebraMathTo provide pre-algebra basics as a foundation for Algebra I. Students continue to review and develop the basic math skills introduced in elementary grades, while learning the language and methods of algebra.Larson Pre-Algebra, Holt McDougal 2012
Foundations of AlgebraMathThis course is an introduction to Algebra 1. The course begins with a review of Pre-Algebra, then goes on to cover the first part of the Algebra 1 textbook. The entire textbook will not be covered, for this reason this course will not count as credit for Algebra 1. This class is intended for students who are not ready to complete the entire Algebra textbook in one academic year. This class moves at a slower pace than Algebra 1 to give students a solid background in Algebra topics. After completion of this course, student will move into Algebra 1.Larson Pre-Algebra, Holt McDougal 2012
Algebra 1MathThis course will include the language and tools of algebra, solving and analyzing linear equations, functions and patterns, solving systems of linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, factoring, quadratic and exponential functions, radical expressions, triangles and equations, and statistics and probability. Upon successful completion of this class, the student will move onto Geometry or Honors Geometry.Algebra 1, 2015 Pearson
Algebra 2MathThis course of study begins with a thorough review of fundamental algebra skills and concepts, linear equations qualities, followed by chapters on functions and graphs; systems of equations and inequalities; polynomials; rational expressions; irrational and complex numbers; quadratic functions; polynomial functions; conic sections; exponential and logarithmic functions; and trigonometric functions and graphs. (Pre-requisites: For Algebra II: 70% in Geometry and 80%+ in Algebra I. For Honors Algebra II: 85%+ in Honors Geometry or 95%+ in College Prep Geometry, below 85% at semester move to College Prep Algebra II)Algebra 2 Common Core, Pearson 2015
Honors Algebra 2MathThis course of study begins with a thorough review of fundamental algebra skills and concepts, linear equations qualities, followed by chapters on functions and graphs; systems of equations and inequalities; polynomials; rational expressions; irrational and complex numbers; quadratic functions; polynomial functions; conic sections; exponential and logarithmic functions; and trigonometric functions and graphs. (Pre-requisites: For Algebra II: 70% in Geometry and 80%+ in Algebra I. For Honors Algebra II: 85%+ in Honors Geometry or 95%+ in College Prep Geometry, below 85% at semester move to College Prep Algebra II)Algebra 2 Common Core, Pearson 2015
GeometryMathThis course takes a traditional approach to plane geometry including instruction in logical reasoning through the development of proofs in a formal and informal approach. Topics covered include the language of geometry, reasoning and proofs, parallel and perpendicular lines, congruent triangles, proportions and similarity, right triangles and trigonometry, quadrilaterals, transformations, circles, and area and volume of figures. Students will provide graph paper, lined paper, straight edge and calculator.Geometry, Pearson 2015
Honors GeometryMathThis is an in-depth extension of geometry with added emphasis on writing, vocabulary, and articulation. Alternative assessments are added to the traditional tests.Geometry, Pearson 2015
Introduction to College MathematicsMathThis course was created for students who want to continue learning mathematics after Algebra II but don’t feel confident going into a Pre-Calculus course. This class is heavily based on Trigonometry. Students will develop skills to write and use the definition of trigonometric functions, sketch their graphs, prove identities, solve trigonometric equations, learn and apply the law of sines and cosines, write complex numbers in trigonometric form and find the roots of a complex numbers, learn polar coordinates and look at conic sections and vectors and their relationships to trigonometry. Students will also review logarithms and use their functions for applications and modeling.Trigonometry: 9th Edition. Ron Larson, 2014
Pre-CalculusMathThe goal of this course is to help the student cover the algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric function and their graphs, as well as analytic geometry in preparation for the course in calculus. The prerequisite for this course is successful completion of Algebra II or ICM.Precalculus, 10th edition by Sullivan
Honors PrecalculusMathThis course is designed to prepare students for the AP Calculus Exam. Topics include polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Trigonometry is stressed, covering right angle trigonometry, graphs, using formulas, and solving equations. Systems of equations are solved. Matrices, sequences, probability, and statistics are touched upon. Limits are introduced. Emphasis is placed on using the graphing calculator.Precalculus, 10th edition by Sullivan
CalculusMathThis is a college-level, first year calculus course. Topics include functions, limits, derivatives, anti- derivatives, and applications of all concepts. Students will be able to solve graphically, support numerically, confirm analytically, and interpret the results verbally. The course requires the entire year to cover the material, therefore it is not recommended to take the AP exam as not all the material needed to be successful on the exam will be covered by the testing deadline.Calculus: Graphical Numerical, Algebraic. Prentice Hall, 2007
AP Calculus A/BMathThis college-level course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Exam. Topics include functions, limits, derivatives, anti-derivatives, and applications of all of these concepts. The study of the material will be based on a balanced approach. Students will be able to solve graphically, support numerically, confirm analytically, and interpret results verbally all while applying calculus to problem situations.Calculus: Graphical Numerical, Algebraic. Prentice Hall, 2007
Pre-AlgebraMathThe purpose of this course is to provide pre-Algebra basics as a foundation for Algebra I. Students continue to review and develop the basic math skills introduced in elementary grades, while learning the language and methods of Algebra. The course content includes: Basic skills, understanding concepts, and problem-solving as applied to algebra and functions, integers and coordinate graphing, rational numbers, mathematical reasoning, statistics, data analysis and probability, number sense, and measurement and geometry, as outlined in the California Standards for pre-Algebra.Glencoe, Pre-Algebra, 2008
Advanced Pre-AlgebraMathThis course content and purpose are the same as regular Pre-Algebra, but the students are expected to have mastered the basic math skills introduced in elementary grades, and apply those skills to the study of the language and methods of algebra. Additional enrichment opportunities are available to students in Advanced Pre-Algebra 7.Glencoe, Pre-Algebra, 2008
Foundations of AlgebraMathThis course is an introduction to Algebra 1. The course begins with a review of Pre-Algebra, then goes on to cover the first part of the Algebra 1 textbook. The entire textbook will not be covered, for this reason this course will not count as credit for Algebra 1. This class is intended for students who are not ready to complete the entire Algebra textbook in one academic year. This class moves at a slower pace than Algebra 1 to give students a solid background in Algebra topics. After completion of this course, student will move into Algebra 1.Pearson Algebra 1 Common Core by Charles, Kennedy and Hall
Algebra 1MathStudents will explore and experience a variety of algebraic topics and language to include: the language and tools of algebra, solving linear equations, functions and patterns, analyzing linear equations, solving systems of linear equations, solving linear inequalities, polynomials,factoring, quadratic and exponential functions, radical expressions and triangles, rational expressions and equations, and statistics and probability.CA Algebra 1 Concepts, Skills, and Problem Solving by Glencoe/ McGraw Hill 2008
Boys and Girls PEPhysical EducationThe Physical Education Department of Christian High School is committed to the development and improvement of our students’ physical fitness and the ongoing acquisition of sports-related skills. The curriculum is specifically designed to help students achieve and maintain active and healthy lifestyles. The goal of each class is for students to increase their level of fitness and to learn the value of teamwork, sportsmanship and perseverance. Students are taught to integrate a Christian worldview by demonstrating the fruits of the spirit in their daily interactions with classmates. Through hands-on instruction, students are able to maximize the advancement of their physical, social, mental and spiritual health.
Physical EducationPhysical Education7thThe physical education program provides instruction aimed at developing all physical fitness characteristics and fundamental skills, while teaching genuine Christian character and sportsmanship. Team Sports available to Junior High Students: Boys: Baseball, Basketball, Cross Country, Flag Football, Golf Club, Soccer, Track and Field, Volleyball Girls: Basketball, Cheer, Cross Country, Golf Club, Soccer, Softball, Track and Field, Volleyball
Physical EducationPhysical Education8thThe physical education program provides instruction aimed at developing all physical fitness characteristics and fundamental skills, while teaching genuine Christian character and sportsmanship. Team Sports available to Junior High Students: Boys: Baseball, Basketball, Cross Country, Flag Football, Golf Club, Soccer, Track and Field, Volleyball Girls: Basketball, Cheer, Cross Country, Golf Club, Soccer, Softball, Track and Field, Volleyball
Physical ScienceSciencePhysical Science involves the exploration of matter and energy as they relate to chemistry and physics. The class is divided into two sections: one semester of chemistry and one semester of physics. In the chemistry unit, the topics include properties of matter, states of matter, atomic structure, periodic table, chemical bonds, and chemical reactions. In the physics unit, the topics include motion, forces and motion, forces in fluids, work, power and machines, energy, thermal energy, and heat.Physical Science: Concepts in Action, Prentice Hall, 2006
BiologyScienceBiology, the science of life, is a 2 semester lab survey course dealing with the origin, nature, and relationships of living organisms. The major topics of study include cell biology, genetics, the origins of life, classification, microbiology, the Five Kingdoms, ecology, and a brief introduction to the human body. Students perform many labs during the course, including microscopes, dissections, model-making, and identification.Prentice Hall Biology, Miller/Levine, 2003
Honors BiologyScienceThis is a lab survey course covering the major areas of biology, emphasizing God’s design. The major areas include microbiology, genetics, creation and evolution, the five kingdoms, ecology, and a brief introduction into human biology. Honors Biology requires that students attend several extra labs. Critical thinking and hands-on lab skills are required.Prentice Hall Biology, Prentice Hall, 2003
ChemistryScienceThis lab-based introductory course is designed to provide students with a challenging, relevant, “hands- on”, and content rich introduction to chemistry. Students are encouraged to develop a thoughtful, systematic approach to problem solving as they apply skills essential to understanding the nature of the experimental sciences. The course is designed to meet and/or exceed the Chemistry Content Standards for the State of California. Advanced math intensive chemistry concepts will be approached from a more qualitative, conceptual framework. World of Chemistry, McDougall Litell/ Houghton Mifflin, 2002
Honors ChemistryScienceThis lab-based introductory course is designed to provide students with a challenging, relevant, “hands- on”, and content rich introduction to chemistry. Students are encouraged to develop a thoughtful, systematic approach to problem solving as they apply skills essential to understanding the nature of the experimental sciences. The course is designed to meet and/or exceed the Chemistry Content Standards for the State of California. Advanced math intensive chemistry concepts will be approached from a more qualitative, conceptual framework.World of Chemistry, McDougall Litell/ Houghton Mifflin, 2002
Anatomy and PhysiologyScienceAnatomy/Physiology is the study of the structure and function of the human body. Students will use this knowledge and their science process skills to complete a variety of labs including dissections. Several small projects will be completed during the year.Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, Martini/Bartholomew-2007
Honors Anatomy and PhysiologyScienceThis class is designed to allow the student to learn about their own body, God’s ultimate creation. Students completing this course will be able to describe and examine the human body as a composite of interrelated parts; describe and successfully demonstrate the use of tools appropriate to dissection; identify and analyze symptom and treatments of major diseases; and demonstrate how best to care for their own bodies.Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, Martini/ Bartholomew-2007
PhysicsScienceThis is a two semester lab-based introductory course in general physics covering Newtonian mechanics, waves, electromagnetism, optics, thermodynamics and nuclear physics. Emphasis is placed on the graphical, numerical, and algebraic analysis of experimental data to model real world phenomena and develop insight into core concepts. Students are challenged to implement a thoughtful, systematic approach to problem solving which will equip them to use their factual knowledge as a starting point for developing creative solutions.Holt Physics, Holt, J, Houghton Mifflin and Harcourt, 2009
AP PhysicsScienceThis course provides a rigorous lab intensive introduction to classical Newtonian mechanics and electromagnetism. Emphasis is placed on graphical, numerical and algebraic analysis of experimental data to develop insight into core concepts. Throughout the course students will also receive instruction in the use of introductory calculus as an additional tool for the analysis and description of physical phenomena. However, no previous experience with calculus is necessary. Students are required to attend additional lab sessions. Upon successful completion of the class students will be prepared to pass the AP Physics-1 Exam.Physics for Scientist and Engineers Holt- McDougal, 2008
AP ChemistryScienceThis rigorous lab intensive course will provide students with the equivalent of a 1st year college chemistry course. Students are required to attend additional lab sessions. Upon successful completion of the class students will be prepared to pass the College Board AP Chemistry exam.Chemistry, The Central Science, 10th ed. Prentice Hall
Science 7-Life ScienceScience7thScience 7, Life Science, is a yearlong course, which encompasses the nature of science, ecology, plants, animal life, and human biology. Students will be taught problem solving techniques, experimental protocols, and biblical truths related to these subject areas. Students will be taught science concepts, science skills, technical writing (lab reports), and biblical truths related to these subject areas. Students are taught to discern between facts and assumptions as they explore the branches of Life Science. The material in this course will be introduced through multiple learning modalities, which include note-taking, hands-on activities, labs, and earth science related projects.Science Explorer: Life Science. Boston, MA: Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2009.; Supplemental Materials from the Institute for Creation Research, Creation and Earth Science Museum
Science 8Science8thScience 8, Earth Science, is a yearlong, rigorous course, which encompasses the earth science fields of geology, oceanography, meteorology, astronomy, and origins. Students will be taught science concepts, science skills, technical writing (lab reports), and biblical truths related to these subject areas.Students are taught to discern between facts and assumptions as they explore the branches of Earth Science. The material in this course will be introduced through multiple learning modalities, which include note-taking, hands-on activities, labs, and earth science related projects.Iscience Life. Columbus, OH: McGraw–Hill Education, 2017. Print.

Family Statement of Faith

  • The Statement of Faith does not exhaust the extent of our beliefs.  The Bible itself, as the inspired, inerrant, plenary, and infallible Word of God that speaks with final authority concerning truth, morality, and the proper conduct of mankind, is the sole and final source of all that we believe.  For purposes of CUSSD’s faith, doctrine, practice, policy, and discipline, Shadow Mountain Community Church is CUSSD’s final interpretive authority on the Bible’s meaning and application.
  • We believe that there is one God eternally existent in three persons: Father, Son and Holy Spirit.
  • We believe in the deity of our Lord Jesus Christ, in His virgin birth, and His sinless life, in His miracles, in His vicarious and atoning death through the shedding of His blood, in His bodily resurrection on the third day, in His ascension to the right hand of the Father, and In His personal pre-millennial return to rapture His Church before the Tribulation and His glorious appearing to set up His Millennial Kingdom.   
  • We believe that salvation is by grace alone through faith, apart from works by the merit of the shed blood of Christ, and that the born-again believer is eternally secure in Christ.
  • We believe in the present ministry of the Holy Spirit by whose indwelling the Christian is enabled to live a godly life.
  • We believe in the resurrection of both the saved and the lost; they that are saved unto the resurrection of life, and they that are lost unto the resurrection of damnation.
  • We believe in the spiritual unity of believers in our Lord Jesus Christ.
  • We believe in the individual priesthood of the believer.
  • We believe life begins at conception.
  • We believe that the term “marriage” has only one meaning; the uniting of one biological man and one biological woman in a single, exclusive union, as delineated in Scripture. (Gen. 2:18-25.)  We believe that God intends sexual intimacy to occur only between a biological man and a biological woman who are married to each other. (1 Cor. 6:18; 7:2-5; Heb. 13:4.)  We believe that God has commanded that no intimate sexual activity be engaged in outside of a marriage between a man and a woman.
  • We believe that the Scripture dictates standards of sexual behavior. The unique roles of the male and female are clearly defined in Scripture. Any promiscuity, homosexuality, gender identity issues or other deviations from Biblical principles is a sin that is offensive to God (Matt. 5:18-19; I Cor. 6: 9-10, 19-20; Eph. 5:3-5; 1 Thess. 4:3-8).

SCHOOL-WIDE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

We expect our students to be:

Influential Christians who:

  • Accept the Lord Jesus Christ as personal Savior.
  • Apply Biblical principles as the foundation for moral and spiritual living.
  • Develop and maintain an informed Biblical worldview that shapes their lifestyle choices.
  • Demonstrate God’s love through acts of service and sharing the gospel.

Investigative Learners who:

  • Master a body of knowledge, vocabulary, and skills.
  • Understand, analyze, and order relationships among facts.
  • Assess their needs and apply appropriate strategies to learn concepts and skills.
  • Actively use the tools of learning throughout their lifetime.

Perceptive Thinkers who:

  • Identify, analyze, discriminate, prioritize, and apply information.
  • Have the ability to solve problems by thinking independently and logically.
  • Make responsible and well-reasoned decisions.
  • Actively seek and apply absolute truths.

Effective Communicators who:

  • Demonstrate the ability to accurately understand, interpret, and exchange information.
  • Communicate with eloquence, creativity, and persuasion in writing and in speech.
  • Develop and utilize artistic expression.
  • Proclaim and defend the gospel with wisdom, wit and respect.

Quality Producers who:

  • Demonstrate a growing knowledge of curriculum.
  • Develop their God-given talents and abilities.
  • Display standards of excellence in all pursuits.
  • Work well with others toward a common goal.

Responsible Citizens who:

  • Respect and submit to authority.
  • Actively protect and promote freedom and democracy.
  • Enjoy God’s creation and live as good stewards within it.
  • Recognize and contribute to meeting the needs of others.