HIGH SCHOOL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

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Christian High School Course Catalog

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SubjectGrade LevelCourse TitleCourse DescriptionTextbookNotes
Bible9thThe Story of GodThe Story of God is a year-long survey course which investigates God’s story as it has been revealed through the Bible. With the aim of knowing and loving God and demonstrating that love for other people, students read and examine Scripture, explore its context, and study key passages. Using the Bible as the textbook, students read Israel’s narrative history chronologically in the Old Testament. With the basic knowledge of the Old Testament as a foundation, students then build on this foundation of knowledge by reading and studying the life of Christ and the beginning of the Church in the New Testament. Students finish this course by examining selections from the epistles and Revelation.The Bible
Bible10thThe Life of ChristThe Life of Christ is a year-long study of the life of Jesus Christ centered around the four Gospels. With the aim of knowing and loving God and demonstrating that love for other people, students will read and examine the ministry of Jesus Christ through a harmony of the Gospels approach. Students will explore the early 1st century Jewish culture to better understand the settings and meanings to translate the truth recorded into their lives today. Students will study the teachings, miracles, and example of Jesus Christ throughout His life.The Bible
Bible11thChristian Doctrine/TheologyDuring the school year, students will be taking an in-depth study of the Bible and using it as our authority when examining different Christian Doctrines. The following doctrines will be discussed throughout the semester: Bibliology, Theology Proper, Christology, Pneumatology, Anthropology, Hamartiology, Soteriology, Ecclesiology and Eschatology. The purpose of the course is to disciple the students so they will have a better understanding of the Christian faith. The hope is for the students to own their faith and be confident in their ability to share and defend their faith with others.The Bible
Bible11thHonors Christian Doctrine/TheologyThis course examines the basic doctrines of the Christian faith. The Apostles’ Creed provides an overview of the basic tenets of Christian beliefs, including revelation, the Trinity, creation, reconciliation and the church. Christian Doctrine will be viewed through the lenses of Evangelical Theology. This course is approved for Dual Credit from Colorado Christian University.The Bible
Bible12thChristian Worldview1st Semester – We will study several different world religions including Buddhism, Islam, Mormonism, the Watchtower Society (Jehovah’s Witnesses), Judaism, and Hinduism. Each of these world religions will be critically examined including their founder(s), their beliefs, and their history along with current events that relate to each world religions. The students will establish methods of evaluating these world religions so they can objectively prove they are not true. Each world religion will be contrasted with Scripture from an objective perspective to demonstrate the truth of the Bible and the false beliefs of these opposing world religions. We will also be covering epistemology/logic, the claim from Islam and Mormons that the Bible has been changed from when it was originally written, and evidence from archaeology regarding the Bible’s reliability. We will evaluate what makes a good translation and contrast the JWs view of the Trinity and the nature of Christ with the Biblical teachings.The Bible, World Religions/Apologetics Reader (relevant articles and original source documents)
Bible12thApologetics2nd Semester – We will study the Biblical view of origins (creation/intelligent design), the Darwinian theory of evolution, God’s perspective of homosexuality, the role of Christians in government (Separation of Church and State?), Abortion, the Bible’s view of dating and marriage, and how we can know that the Bible is actually God’s Word. We will examine Multiple opposing views/attacks against the Bible including supposed contradictions, the idea the Bible has been changed over time, and others. We will discuss how to own and defend our faith within and outside the Christian community, especially focusing on the difficult questions students will be presented with in secular universities and the media.The Bible, World Religions/Apologetics Reader (relevant articles and original source documents)
ElectivesMultipleAspireThe CHS ASPIRE Program is designed to provide academic support as well as provide students with individualized study skills instruction and includes the added benefit of the ASPIRE teacher acting as a teacher-student-parent liaison. This program provides the student with a teacher-assisted study hall period as well as additional access to the ASPIRE teacher throughout the day. If the student has accommodations that would take them outside of class for testing, the ASPIRE teacher is available throughout the day for those circumstances. The ASPIRE program is an academic support system taken for a credit/no credit grade. There is a $3,000 fee for ASPIRE classes.
ElectivesMultipleIntroduction to CommunicationsEmphasis will be placed on intrapersonal communication (communication with the self) and interpersonal communication (communication with others). Topics include nonverbal communication, listening, interviewing, working in groups, conflict resoluation, and how to have healthy relationships. This course is also designed to provide the student with the skills needed for effective public speaking. These skills include: preparing and organizaing a speech, developing speech content, and presenting a speech. The goal is to help students improve their communication in both a personal and professional context
ElectivesMultipleIntroduction to Mass CommunicationsIntroduction to Mass Communications is a course that deals with the histroy and development of print and electronic media including magazines, newspapers, television, movies, radio, and the internet. Special attention will be paid to current concerns and controversy regarding the effects of media content on individuals and society. The study of media law and ethical concerns will also be included.
ElectivesMultipleCulinary ArtsThis course is a hands-on entry level culinary course that introduces students to a professional kitchen. Culinary Arts is designed to prepare students to be ready to embark upon a career in food service, but students will find that the skills learned in class can be used to prepare foods at home as well. Students will learn food safety and sanitation, how to use professional kitchen equipment, basic cooking techniques (including knife skills), and culinary terminology. A focus on knowledge, skill, and judgement of a professional cook will be a major aspect of the curriculum.Proposed New Course for 22-23Class Fee: $50.00 per semester
ElectivesMultipleFinancial PeaceThe goal of this course is to empower students with knowledge and application of basic financial principles so that they can make sound financial decisions for life.Foundations in Personal Finance, High School Edition, RamseyThis is a one-semester class generally paired with On Your Own
ElectivesMultipleOn Your OwnThe goal of this class is to teach Biblically sound independent living skills as they relate to values, goals, money, employment, housing selection and general decision making practices, in order to better prepare students to be successful stewards of what God has entrusted to them. All of this is for the purpose of engaging Spiritual growth to influence others for Christ.Group projects and class assignmentsThis is a one-semester class generally paired with Financial Peace
ElectivesMultipleGraphic DesignThe year of Visual Design develops skills that lay the foundation for photography and producing print- ready communications: graphic design principles, visual comps, print production development, shared project management skills such as interviewing and project scheduling, peer review, and redesign. Project activities focus on developing effective communications that can be deployed in print and on the web. Students develop a variety of graphics, poster redesigns, logos, business cards, product packaging and client advertisement. Students design documents and visual comps that are reviewed by clients. Students culminate the Year of Visual Design with a project that reflect on the skills and topics they’ve covered thus far and begin to explore the career areas that interest them in this area.
ElectivesMultipleHome Economics IThis elective course is a hands-on, project-oriented course. Home Economics 1 is divided into three parts: Home safety/interior design, clothing care/hand sewing and foods and nutrition. This course is designed to give students food knowledge necessary for resourceful, safe, healthy, and creative food preparation. Students will also learn how to hand stitch and create a Christmas stocking. Students will get the opportunity to design a room of their liking in interior design, and they will get to plan a party from start to finish with their group members in party planning. Weekly food labs will provide the framework for practical assignments, projects, and activities. The majority of labs will be hands-on food preparation/cooking experiences and projects. The main objective in this class is to get students comfortable in the kitchen, preparing food, following recipes, learning the basic stitches, the color schemes of interior design and how to work as a group. This elective also features little homework.Class Fee: $70.00 per semester
ElectivesMultipleHome Economics IIThis elective course is a hands-on, project-oriented course. Home Economics II is divided into three parts: Child development, sewing and foods and nutrition. This course is designed to give students food knowledge necessary for resourceful living, safety, caring for others, and creative food preparation. Weekly food labs will provide the framework for practical assignments, projects, and activities. The majority of labs will be hands-on food preparation/cooking experiences and projects. In Home Economics II students will do additional research projects and more complicated food prep, working independently a great deal of the time. This elective also features little homework.Class Fee: $70.00 per semester
ElectivesMultipleWoodshop IWoodworking is a course designed to introduce students to general woodworking practices. Students will gain knowledge and experience through Multiple projects, demonstrations, classroom presentations and research on their own. Students will be expected to learn about and safely use hand tools, power tools and woodworking machinery. The projects will be designed to give students a building, progressive experience to acquaint the learner with a wide range of woodworking techniques and tools.Class Fee: $50.00 per semester
ElectivesMultipleWoodshop IIWoodworking II is a course designed to cultivate woodworking skills for students who have completed the introductory course and wish to attempt more sophisticated projects. Students will build upon knowledge gained in Woodshop level I to be able to move on to building furniture quality projects, especially with hardwoods. After a review of safety information, each student will be asked to demonstrate their skills on the machinery to certify their safe operation of each tool. Students will then be asked to take some initiative in designing projects that have piqued their interest and which will continue allowing them to develop their woodworking skills.Class Fee: $70.00 per semester
ElectivesMultipleYearbookThis course is designed to teach the skills necessary to produce the school yearbook, which offers a complete record of an entire school year. The year begins by planning the coverage for the school year and designing a unifying theme for the book. Students will study magazine journalism including layout and design techniques, writing and editing copy, headlines and picture captions. This course provides the study of and practice in gathering and analyzing information, interviewing, note taking and photography. At times, deadlines require that staff members work after school, on weekends, and holidays. Students will learn good work habits and are responsible for all phases of yearbook publication
Engineering/Computer ScienceMultipleAP Computer Science PrinciplesThis Computer science course is designed to be foundational for students desiring to program. There are two parts to this course: We will be covering the essentials for understanding what computing systems and networks do and how they process data. Computer science is broad in scope and includes topics such as data privacy, computational thinking and computer innovations. This will serve well to help with comprehending how programming languages work and function in programming. The second part of this course is practicing the foundations of computer programming. We will be covering a bit of both Python and Javascript. The end result of the course will be preparation for the AP written exam and the development of a computer program in the programming language of choice
Engineering/Computer ScienceMultipleIntroduction to Engineering DesignStudents dig deep into the engineering design process, applying math, science, and engineering standards to hands-on projects like designing a new product or improving an existing product using innovative software programs and 3D printers.Prerequisite: Algebra I or concurrently enrolled in Algebra I,
Engineering/Computer ScienceMuliplePrinciples of EngineeringThis Project Lead the Way survey course exposes students to major concepts they’ll encounter in a post-secondary engineering course of study. Topics include mechanisms, energy, statics, materials, and kinematics. Students develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, document their work, and communicate solutions.Honors/UC ApprovedPrerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design
Engineering/Computer ScienceMultipleCivil Engineering and ArchitectureCivil Engineering and Architecture (CEA) is a high school level specialization course in the PLTW Engineering Program. In CEA students are introduced to important aspects of building and site design and development. They apply math, science, and standard engineering practices to design both residential and commercial projects anddocument their work using 3D architectural design software. Utilizing the activity-project-problem-based (APB) teaching and learning pedagogy, students will progress from completing structured activities to solving open- ended projects and problems that require them to develop planning, documentation, communication, and otherprofessional skills.Through both individual and collaborative team activities, projects, and problems, students will solve problems as they practice common design and development protocols such as project management and peer review. Students will develop skill in engineering calculations, technical representation and documentation of design solutions according to accepted technical standards, and use of current 3D architectural design and modeling software to represent and communicate solutions.Prerequisites: Principals of Engineering or Introduction to Engineering Design. Successful completion of Algebra 1
English9thEnglish 1This class provides a more in-depth study of literature and writing through the rhetorical approach and builds on the student’s acknowledged interest in the language arts. Students are encouraged to participate in meaningful class discussions and writing assignments. Additionally, a goal is set for students to read and analyze a variety of literary genres and learn to write critically while embracing the bible as the source of truth. Knowledge of the English language and literature will prepare the students to succeed academically and to think critically as followers of Christ, recognizing that all knowledge must be filtered through the lens of God’s Word.All Quiet on the Western Front, The Odyssey, Pilgrim’s Progress, Romeo and Juliet,, The Chosen, Prentice Hall Literature: Timeless voices, Timeless Themes, Short Story Anthology, Poetry Anthology, The Most Dangerous Game,To Build A Fire, The Scarlet Ibis, Antigone, Hercules, Confessions
English9thEnglish 1 HonorsAn overview of World literature provides a more in-depth study of literature and writing through the rhetorical approach and builds on the student’s acknowledged interest in the language arts. Students are encouraged to participate in meaningful class discussions and writing assignments. Additionally, a goal is set for students to read and analyze a variety of literary genres and learn to write critically while embracing the bible as the source of truth. Knowledge of the English language and literature will prepare the students to succeed academically and to think critically as followers of Christ, recognizing that all knowledge must be filtered through the lens of God’s Word.Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes: Gold, Prentice Hall, 2002; The Bible. The Odyssey, Homer; Pilgrim’s Progress, Bunyan; Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare; Antigone, Sophocles; The Chosen, Potok; Confessions, Augustine; Introduction to Mythology, Hamilton. All Quiet on the Western Front, Erich Maria Remarque; Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, Stevenson. Required reading and writing projects are due the first school day of the fall semester.
English10thEnglish IIEnglish II emphasizes the analysis and interpretation of world literature, specifically European works. Selected novels, plays, and short story anthologies will be read and analyzed. The writing process will be used in both informal literary responses as well as formal academic essays. Both verbal and written communication skills will be practiced. Vocabulary words will be selected directly from the literature being read as well as Multiple literary terms as per language arts standards. Socratic Seminars will be held regularly to further develop cognitive and rhetorical skills.Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes: Platinum, Prentice Hall, 2002; The Bible. Frankenstein, Mary Shelley; Hamlet, William Shakespeare; Animal Farm, George Orwell; To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee. Lord of the Flies, William Golding. Required reading and writing projects are due the first school day of the fall semester.
English10thEnglish II HonorsHonors English II emphasizes the analysis and interpretation of world literature, specifically European works. Selected novels, plays, and short story anthologies will be read and analyzed. The writing process will be used in both informal literary responses as well as formal academic essays. Both verbal and written communication skills will be practiced. Vocabulary words will be selected directly from the literature being read as well as Multiple literary terms as per language arts standards. Socratic Seminars will be held regularly to further develop cognitive and rhetorical skills Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes: Platinum, Prentice Hall, 2002; The Bible. Frankenstein, Mary Shelley; Hamlet, William Shakespeare; Animal Farm, George Orwell; To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee.: Screwtape Letters, C. S. Lewis; Life of Pi, Yann Martel Lord of the Flies, William Golding. Cry, Thy Beloved Country, Alan Paton. Required reading and writing projects are due the first school day of the fall semester.
English11thEnglish IIIEnglish III is a systematic study of America’s literary achievement from the earliest Puritan writers to more contemporary authors. Emphasis is placed upon honing writing skills, analyzing literary pieces, and participating in meaningful class discussions.Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes: The American Experience, Prentice Hall; 2002 The Bible. The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorn; The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain; The Crucible, Arthur Miller; The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald; Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury; Multiple short stories and poems. The Old Man and the Sea, by Ernest Hemingway and The Pearl, John Steinbeck. Required reading and writing projects are due the first school day of the fall semester.
English11thEnglish III HonorsThe course is a cursory view of American literature in fiction, poetry, drama, political writing, biographies and sermons. Students will explore the inception of these genres and follow them through chronologically as the United States of America develops. A biblical and historical integration will help students interpret life issues, and cultural influence. Analysis, critical thinking, collaboration, communication, and creativity will be utilized. Socratic Seminars and rhetorical writing are core components. Students will be responsible for rhetorical arguments in an essay upon completion of each unit.Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes: The American Experience, Prentice Hall; 2002 The Bible. The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne; The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain; The Crucible, Arthur Miller; The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald; The Power of Sympathy, William Brown. The Old Man and the Sea, by Ernest Hemingway, The Pearl, John Steinbeck and Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury. Required reading and writing projects are due the first school day of the fall semester.
English12thEnglish IVAn overview of British literature is taught beginning with an introduction to language and the Anglo-Saxon literature, continuing through the Twenty-first century. Eight major works along with poetry anthologies are read and lives of important authors are studied. Emphasis is given to the development of the English language as it relates to each period of literary works. The class is structured so that all the works are presented in a chronological order showing a strong relationship between literary trends of the day and the historical developments. Social issues, political movements, and religious influences are all catalysts for the literature of the time period.The British Tradition Timeless Voices, Timeless, Prentice Hall Literature; Themes, published 2002; The Bible. Beowulf, Anonymous; Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer; Tragedy of Macbeth, William Shakespeare; Paradise Lost, John Milton; Gulliver’s Travels, Jonathan Swift; Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen; The Great Divorce, C.S. Lewis. Heart of Darkness, by Joseph Conrad. Required reading and writing projects are due the first school day of the fall semester.
English12thAP English Literature and CompositionAn overview of British literature is taught beginning with an introduction to language and the Anglo-Saxon literature, continuing through the Twenty-first century. Eight major works along with poetry anthologies are read and lives of important authors are studied. Emphasis is given to the development of the English language as it relates to each period of literary works. The class is structured so that all the works are presented in a chronological order showing a strong relationship between literary trends of the day and the historical developments. Social issues, political movements, and religious influences are all catalysts for the literature of the time period. AP students will use their writing to help improve their ability to understand issues and texts. They will also read critically and analytically and develop their own writer’s voice. As they engage with the texts, they will see the relationship between Multiple writings and how they relate to their own experiences. Students will also develop a repertoire of rewriting and rhetorical strategies, learn how to develop an argumentative thesis, master Multiple research techniques, become proficient in developing a research paper, and monitor their writing for correct use of grammar and punctuation.The British Tradition Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes; Prentice Hall Literature, published 2002; The Bible; Prentice Hall World Masterpieces published 1991; Allan Casson-Cliff’s AP English Literature and Composition ; in-class handouts; Norton Anthology to Literature, 4th Edition. Beowulf, Anonymous; Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer; Tragedy of Macbeth, William Shakespeare; Paradise Lost, John Milton; Gulliver’s Travels, Jonathan Swift; Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen; The Great Divorce, C.S. Lewis. Heart of Darkness, Conrad, Jane Eyre, Bronte, The Importance of Being Earnest, Wilde. Required reading and writing projects are due the first school day of the fall semester.
EnglishMultipleEssential English 9/10Essential English 9 is an alternative English course that addresses traditional concepts in English with an emphasis on grade level competencies. Students will write in different genres such as, narrative, expository, descriptive, persuasive, and critical modes. Vocabulary and grammar will be a skill focus. Literary devices will be strategically comprehended. Reading comprehension will be increased through the use of contextual clues; using phonics and word structure; visualizing; questioning; predicting; previewing text; summarizing; making inferences. Student selected novels, short stories and poetry will prepare students for community college, private college, and other career paths.Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes: Gold, Prentice Hall, 2002 (9th grade level), Fundamentals of Literature, BJP, 2010 (9th grade level), Grammar & Composition Work-Text III, A BEKA Book Language Series, fifth edition or equivalent, Vocabulary for Achievement by Margaret Ann Richek, third edition or equivalent. Outside literature by Multiple authors.Not UC Approved
English11thExperiential English 11Experiential English 11 is a study of America’s literary achievement including fiction, non-fiction, and film. Emphasis is placed upon the writing process of both formal and informal pieces, analyzing short literary pieces, and participating in meaningful class discussions.Old Man and the Sea, excerpts from The Great Gatsby, a choice novel, and selected poems, short stories, and articles.Not UC Approved
English12thCollege/Vocational Pathways English 12General English 12 is a study of academic reading, writing, and reasoning through nonfiction and fiction texts. Emphasis is placed upon the writing process of both formal and informal pieces, analyzing short literary pieces, and participating in meaningful class discussions. Texts cover informational articles and biographical information in addition to creative non-fiction. Students prepare personal creative writing projects and presentations, practice important life skills such as effective communication in interviews, resumés and official documents, as well as produce oral and written text-based reflections.Excerpts from historical biographies, short narratives, and selected articNot UC Approved
Fine ArtsMultipleAP Studio ArtThis course is designed as a studio art class taught at the college level. Every aspect of the class will require students to respond at a higher level of responsibility, artistic expression, and sophistication. Students will have an understanding that their work will demonstrate a sense of relevance based upon individual style, technique, and ideation. Students will expand their art skills and experience as they prepare a two-part portfolio for the Advanced Placement Studio Art Program as outlined by the College Board requirements.
Fine ArtsMultipleArt IThis is an introductory art elective that offers a variety of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional experiences. Students develop observation and technical skills in drawing, painting, design, printmaking, and sculpture while developing confidence in creative and visual expression. With an emphasis on studio production, this course is designed to develop art appreciation, higher-level thinking and problem solving, art-related technology skills, art criticism, art history, and aesthetics. This basic art course presents a core of knowledge essential to all other art classes.
Fine ArtsMultipleArt IIThis is an intermediate art course designed for further development and exploration of a range of media, techniques, and processes in drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, and design. Through this course students will explore creative thinking that reflects complex concepts, as well as develop confidence and risk-taking abilities in the visual expression of their ideas. They develop competencies and skills in problem solving, communication, and management of time and resources that contribute to lifelong learning and career skills.
Fine ArtsMultipleArt IIIThis is an advanced art course designed to build upon content and skills from Art I & II for highly motivated art students. Through a variety of artistic mediums and styles, each project in this course encourages exploration and development of composition, media skills & techniques, expression, inventiveness, originality, personal style, student voice, and conceptual skills. Students will interpret and manipulate the Elements of Art and the Principles of Design to develop portfolio quality pieces. All students are required to keep a sketchbook for ideas, skill building, project development and research, and lesson content which will include vocabulary, media techniques, and art movement/artist studies. In addition, they will respond to their artwork through teacher, peer, and class critiques, written self-assessment and/or artist’s statement, and present their work in both a digital and physical portfolio. They develop competencies and skills in independent and critical thinking, problem solving, communication, and management of time and resources that contribute to lifelong learning and career professionalism. Students will be required to exhibit selected works in art showcases twice per year. Participation in Multiple art competitions is strongly encouraged.
Fine ArtsMultipleArt III HonorsThis is an advanced art course designed to build upon content and skills from Art I & II for highly motivated art students. Through a variety of artistic mediums and styles, each project in this course encourages exploration and development of composition, media skills & techniques, expression, inventiveness, originality, personal style, student voice, and conceptual skills. Students will interpret and manipulate the Elements of Art and the Principles of Design to develop portfolio quality pieces. All students are required to keep a sketchbook for ideas, skill building, project development and research, and lesson content which will include vocabulary, media techniques, and art movement/artist studies. In addition, they will respond to their artwork through teacher, peer, and class critiques, written self-assessment and/or artist’s statement, and present their work in both a digital and physical portfolio. They develop competencies and skills in independent and critical thinking, problem solving, communication, and management of time and resources that contribute to lifelong learning and career professionalism. Students will be required to exhibit selected works in art showcases twice per year. Participation in Multiple art competitions is strongly encouraged.In addition to the requirements of Art III, Honors students will complete a research-based study and development of a mini-series in an area of their choice throughout the school year. Work will be critiqued throughout the year and assessed at the conclusion of each semester. They will write an artist statement that touches on their style, research, influences, and development to accompany their series. Students will formally present their body of work at the conclusion of both semesters. The second semester presentation will require students to curate an exhibition of their portfolio, research, and artist statement for the public and will conclude in a written reflection and discussion of their exhibition.
Fine ArtsMultipleChoirChoir is a performance-oriented class designed to provide the singer basic training in music theory, vocal production, and performance proficiency through concert experiences.Class Fee $300.00 Students are required to purchase formal wear and accessories
Fine ArtsMultipleVocal Ensemble/Patriot PraiseVocal Ensemble is an intermediate/advanced level class designed to develop students’ music theory knowledge and skills, to study and practice a wide range of vocal music, to learn and experience leadership, and to provide opportunities for performance proficiency. Students will become skilled at musical notation and sight-reading. They will develop vocal/instrumental skills and establish criteria to evaluate music through critical listening. The Vocal Ensemble is responsible for designing and leading chapel music each week for the whole student body and for performing with the Choir at all performances during the year. Requires audition, application and recommendation.Class Fee $300.00 Students are required to purchase formal wear and accessories. Optional field trips may require additional fees.
Fine ArtsMultipleConcert Band/Marching BandThis band consists of instrumentalists at intermediate- to-advanced playing ability, performing as a group. First semester, the marching band competes and performs in local parades and field competitions. Second semester, the concert band is adjudicated and performs in Multiple venues.Class Fee $400.00 Optional field trips may require additional feesMarching Band Qualifies for 1 PE Credit per semester.
Fine ArtsMultipleJazz BandStudents perform different styles of jazz music as well as explore the art of improvisation. This group is adjudicated during the second semester.
Fine ArtsMultipleDigital Video ProductionThe students use their own creative ideas to create several short films each semester. In addition, the instructor assigns individual video projects, as well as group projects, in order for the students to better understand how to make successful short films. In this course, the students complete at least three individual projects each semester.
Fine ArtsMultipleAdvanced Film ProductionStudents will use their own creative ideas to create several short films each semester. In addition, the instructor creates groups within the class who are assigned Multiple chapel projects during the year based on Multiple subject areas. The students create, and assist in creating, other video projects on campus.
Fine ArtsMultipleDrama IDrama I is a year-long high school class designed to give an overview of acting, the theatre, technical theatre, and performance techniques. This allows students to decide if they would like to further pursue acting in Drama II upon. Students will both participate in both cast and crew for a one-act play and learn basic theatre vocabulary, theatre history, acting styles, aspects of technical theatre, and memorization techniques while focusing on creative movement, voice control, character development, and production development.
Fine ArtsMultipleDrama IIDrama II is an advanced Performance, Production, and Competition course, which builds from the basic knowledge gained in Drama Wheel, JH Drama and Drama I. Drama II students are responsible for performing in, designing, and producing Christian High School’s Main Stage plays with the direction and guidance of the director/drama teacher. The class format for Drama II will be that of a professional theater company, with technical crews, acting workshops, production meetings, rehearsals, and a team atmosphere. Audition & teacher approval required.Drama 2 Travel/Competition Fee: $200.00
Fine ArtsMultipleIntroduction to PhotographyIntroduction to Photography is a non-darkroom course that introduces students to basic camera function and care, an introduction to using Photoshop to edit and enhance photos, and create “digital art.”
Fine ArtsMultipleAdvanced PhotographyAdvanced Digital Photography is designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art photography. At the end of the term, students will submit a portfolio for faculty review. In building the portfolio, students experience a variety of concepts covered this year, techniques, and approaches designed to help them demonstrate their abilities as well as their versatility with techniques, problem solving, and ideation. The portfolio is developed within a concentration that investigates an idea of personal interest for each individual student.Prerequisite: Introduction to PhotographyNot UC Approved as a Fine Art
Foreign Language9thSpanish IThis Spanish course introduces foundational vocabulary and grammar concepts to students. The present and preterit tense are both taught as well as elementary fundamentals of Spanish grammar including: gender and number of nouns, articles, and object pronouns. Students will develop skills in the four aspects of language: Listening Comprehension, Speaking, Reading, and Writing on an introductory level. The Hispanic culture is also taught through selected readings, videos, and discussions.Descubre Level I, Vista Higher Learning, 2011
Foreign Language10thSpanish IIThis is an intermediate-level Spanish course building on the concepts and vocabulary taught in our level I course. The Subjunctive and The Perfect Tenses are the focus of the grammar units in our level II course. Students will develop skills in the four aspects of language: Listening Comprehension, Speaking, Reading, and Writing on an intermediate level. The Hispanic culture is also taught through selected readings, videos, and discussions.Descubre Level II, Vista Higher Learning, 2011
Foreign Language11thSpanish III HonorsThis is an advanced-level Spanish course utilizing all the concepts and vocabulary from our level I and II courses, with additional vocabulary being introduced and grammar concepts being refined. Conversation and writing are emphasized and reinforced through daily usage in class and outside the classroom. Further study of the Hispanic culture is gained through Multiple media and activities.Descubre Level III, Vista Higher Learning, 2011
Foreign Language12thHonors Spanish IVThe AP Spanish Language course is instructed exclusively in Spanish. Students are expected and encouraged to use their Spanish throughout their daily interactions in and out of the classroom to enable them to implement the foundations of language created in the past three years of Spanish study. This course is taught around themes that will help in understanding the culture and language at a real world level.Triángulo Aprobado Wayside Publishing, 2011; AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam Preparation, Vista Higher Learning, 2014; Temas, Vista Higher Learning, 2014
Foreign LanguageMultipleASL 1This course will expose students to the fundamentals of ASL. The course will include basic vocabulary, syntax, finger spelling, and grammatical non-manual signs as a foundation of ASL enhancement. ASL will introduce a cultural knowledge and understanding of the deaf community.Signing Naturally. Smith, Cheri, et al. DawnSign Press, 2008. Print
Foreign LanguageMultipleASL 2ASL 2 is a continuation of ASL 1. This course is designed to continue development of American Sign Language expressive and receptive skills, grammar, vocabulary, cultural awareness, and related terminology. This course will continue building on cultural knowledge and understanding of the Deaf Community.Moore, Matthew S. For Hearing People Only. 4th ed., vol. 1 & 2, Deaf Life Press, 2004
Foreign LanguageMultipleASL 3ASL 3 is a continuation of ASL 2. This course is designed to continue development of American Sign Language expressive and receptive skills, grammar, vocabulary, cultural awareness, and related terminology. This course will continue building on cultural knowledge and understanding of the Deaf Community.Moore, Matthew S. For Hearing People Only. 4th ed., vol. 1 & 2, Deaf Life Press, 2004
Foreign LanguageMultipleASL 4American Sign Language 4 is for highly motivated learners. American Sign Language 4 offers students an expanded series of informal and formal linguistic learning activities designed to empower students to acquire ‘high-intermediate’ communicative skills and to foster the cultural competencies necessary to successfully interact with the Deaf community. Course content will expand the skills acquired by the students in American Sign Language 3. Specific content includes, but is not limited to, more advanced language structures and idiomatic expressions, with emphasis on conversational skills, analyzing structures, translating authentic material and reading and responding to various literature sources of the Deaf community. Special emphasis is given to the delivery of interpreted text, analysis of various modes of sign communication in Deaf culture, application of language skills for personal enjoyment and within a professional context, an exploration of Deaf poetry and humor as well as Audism, Cochlear Implants and different techologies used in Deaf Culture. There is additional growth in vocabulary for practical purposes. Media selections are varied and taken from authentic target language literary works.Students will: 1. Successfully communicate within increasingly complex social contexts 2. Demonstrate cross-cultural competencies necessary to successfully interact with the Deaf community 3. Explore Deaf poetry and humor as well as Audism, Cochlear Implants and different techologies used in Deaf Culture 4. Demonstrate the use of critical-thinking skills throughout the course study.Moore, Matthew S. For Hearing People Only. 4th ed., vol. 1 & 2, Deaf Life Press, 2004, Deaf Culture Our Way
MathMultipleIntegrated Pre-AlgebraThis course is an introduction to pre-algebra. The course begins as a review of basic mathematic fundamentals and operations. The course uses the pre-algebra curriculum but is designed to expose students to the general concepts of pre-algebra but spend the bulk of time reinforcing foundational concepts to ready them for pre-algebra the following year.Larson Pre-Algebra, Holt McDougal, 2012
MathMultiplePre-AlgebraTo provide pre-algebra basics as a foundation for Algebra I. Students continue to review and develop the basic math skills introduced in elementary grades, while learning the language and methods of algebra and some geometry basics as well. Students should advance to Algebra 1 the next year.Larson Pre-Algebra, Holt McDougal 2012
MathMultipleAlgebra 1This course will include the language and tools of algebra, solving and analyzing linear equations, functions and patterns, solving systems of linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, factoring, quadratic and exponential functions, radical expressions, triangles and equations, and statistics and probability. Upon successful completion of this class, the student will move onto Geometry or Honors Geometry.Algebra 1, 2015 Pearson
MathMultipleGeometryThis course takes a traditional approach to plane geometry including instruction in logical reasoning through the development of proofs in a formal and informal approach. Topics covered include the language of geometry, reasoning and proofs, parallel and perpendicular lines, congruent triangles, proportions and similarity, right triangles and trigonometry, quadrilaterals, transformations, circles, and area and volume of figures. Students will provide graph paper, lined paper, straight edge and calculator.Geometry, Pearson 2015
MathMultipleHonors GeometryThis is an in-depth extension of geometry with added emphasis on writing, vocabulary, and articulation. Alternative assessments are added to the traditional tests.Geometry, Pearson 2015
MathMultipleAlgebra 2This course of study begins with a thorough review of fundamental algebra skills and concepts, linear equations qualities, followed by chapters on functions and graphs; systems of equations and inequalities; polynomials; rational expressions; irrational and complex numbers; quadratic functions; polynomial functions; conic sections; exponential and logarithmic functions; and trigonometric functions and graphs. (Pre-requisites: For Algebra II: 70% in Geometry and 80%+ in Algebra I. For Honors Algebra II: 85%+ in Honors Geometry or 95%+ in College Prep Geometry, below 85% at semester move to College Prep Algebra II)Algebra 2 Common Core, Pearson 2015
MathMultipleHonors Algebra 2This course of study begins with a thorough review of fundamental algebra skills and concepts, linear equations qualities, followed by chapters on functions and graphs; systems of equations and inequalities; polynomials; rational expressions; irrational and complex numbers; quadratic functions; polynomial functions; conic sections; exponential and logarithmic functions; and trigonometric functions and graphs. (Pre-requisites: For Algebra II: 70% in Geometry and 80%+ in Algebra I. For Honors Algebra II: 85%+ in Honors Geometry or 95%+ in College Prep Geometry, below 85% at semester move to College Prep Algebra II)Algebra 2 Common Core, Pearson 2015
MathMultiplePre-CalculusThe goal of this course is to help the student cover the algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric function and their graphs, as well as analytic geometry in preparation for the course in calculus. The prerequisite for this course is successful completion of Algebra II or ICM.Precalculus, 10th edition by Sullivan
MathMultipleHonors PrecalculusThis course is designed to prepare students for the AP Calculus Exam. Topics include polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Trigonometry is stressed, covering right angle trigonometry, graphs, using formulas, and solving equations. Systems of equations are solved. Matrices, sequences, probability, and statistics are touched upon. Limits are introduced. Emphasis is placed on using the graphing calculator.Precalculus, 10th edition by Sullivan
MathMultipleCalculusThis is a college-level, first year calculus course. Topics include functions, limits, derivatives, anti- derivatives, and applications of all concepts. Students will be able to solve graphically, support numerically, confirm analytically, and interpret the results verbally. The course requires the entire year to cover the material, therefore it is not recommended to take the AP exam as not all the material needed to be successful on the exam will be covered by the testing deadline.Calculus: Graphical Numerical, Algebraic. Prentice Hall, 2007
MathMultipleAP Calculus A/BThis college-level course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Exam. Topics include functions, limits, derivatives, anti-derivatives, and applications of all of these concepts. The study of the material will be based on a balanced approach. Students will be able to solve graphically, support numerically, confirm analytically, and interpret results verbally all while applying calculus to problem situations.Calculus: Graphical Numerical, Algebraic. Prentice Hall, 2007
MathMultipleStatisticsThis course is an introductory course in statistics, stressing development of statistical thinking, the assessment of credibility and value of the inferences made from the data, with emphasis on data collection and analysis.The Practice of Statistics, 4th ed. by Starnes, Yates, and Moore
Physical EducationMultipleBoys and Girls PEThe physical education program provides instruction aimed at developing all physical fitness characteristics and fundamental skills, while teaching genuine Christian character and sportsmanship.
Science9thForensicsForensics is the interdisciplinary application of science to investigate and establish how historical events have occurred for the purposes of providing evidence to resolve criminal, legal, and investigative issues. This course utilizes skills and concepts from multiple disciplines, such as physics, chemistry, biology, anthropology, psychology, and statistics to accomplish its goals and. Laboratory practice will make up at least 25% of course in order to explore topics such as DNA fingerprinting, blood analysis, toxicology, crime scene investigations, counterfeiting, and rate of decay.This course requires that significant instructional time be spent in hands-on laboratory work, with an emphasis on inquiry-based investigations that provide students with opportunities to demonstrate the foundational biological principles and apply all the attributes of the NGSS 3D instructional model and the seven science practices to their learning. This course is a UC Certified Lab Science.Forensic Science by Bertino & Bertino, 3rd ed.
ScienceMultipleAnatomy and PhysiologyAnatomy/Physiology is the study of the structure and function of the human body. Students will use this knowledge and their science process skills to complete a variety of labs including dissections. Several small projects will be completed during the year.Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, Martini/Bartholomew-2007
ScienceMultipleAP ChemistryThis rigorous lab intensive course will provide students with the equivalent of a 1st year college chemistry course. Students are required to attend additional lab sessions. Upon successful completion of the class students will be prepared to pass the College Board AP Chemistry exam.Chemistry, The Central Science, 10th ed. Prentice HallOn course selection form for 2022-23.Offered alternate years and based on student demand. Exam fee is $105.00 which includes a $10.00 program fee.
ScienceMultipleAP PhysicsThis course provides a rigorous lab intensive introduction to classical Newtonian mechanics and electromagnetism. Emphasis is placed on graphical, numerical and algebraic analysis of experimental data to develop insight into core concepts. Throughout the course students will also receive instruction in the use of introductory calculus as an additional tool for the analysis and description of physical phenomena. However, no previous experience with calculus is necessary. Students are required to attend additional lab sessions. Upon successful completion of the class students will be prepared to pass the AP Physics-1 Exam.Physics for Scientist and Engineers Holt- McDougal, 2008AP Physics will be offered in 2023-24. Offered based on student demand. Exam fee is $105.00 which includes a $10.00 program fee.
ScienceMultipleAP BiologyAP Biology is a college level biology course designed for the biology major. It follows the AP biology curriculum framework program proposed by the College Board. Range and depth of topics as well as the course textbook is significantly different from that of the general and honors biology classes. Topics covered include: chemistry, cells, genetics, plant and animal form & function, ecology, evolution and creation. Students will build upon their foundation gained from previous general/honors biology and chemistry courses. Students will gather, analyze, and think critically about course material through a secular and Biblical worldview. Failure to reach benchmarks may result in the student’s removal from class.Campbell Biology in Focus by Pearson Education. ISBN: 978-0-321-81380-0Offered based on student demand. Exam fee is $105.00 which includes a $10.00 program fee.
ScienceMultipleBiologyCollege Prep Biology is a yearlong rigorous course, which encompasses the nature of life, ecology, cells, genetics, evolution, microorganisms and fungi, plants, invertebrates, vertebrates, and the human body. Students will be taught science concepts, science skills, lab skills, technical writing (lab reports) and Biblical truths related to these subject areas. The material in this course will be introduced through multiple learning modalities, which include note-taking, introduction to critical thinking, hands-on activities, graphs, and related projects. This course fulfills the life-science requirement for graduation. Miller, Kenneth R., and Joseph S. Levine. Biology. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2004. Print; Miller, Kenneth R., and Joseph S. Levine. Biology. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2014. Print.
ScienceMultipleChemistryThis lab-based introductory course is designed to provide students with a challenging, relevant, “hands- on”, and content rich introduction to chemistry. Students are encouraged to develop a thoughtful, systematic approach to problem solving as they apply skills essential to understanding the nature of the experimental sciences. The course is designed to meet and/or exceed the Chemistry Content Standards for the State of California. Advanced math intensive chemistry concepts will be approached from a more qualitative, conceptual framework. World of Chemistry, McDougall Litell/ Houghton Mifflin, 2002
ScienceMultipleHonors Anatomy and PhysiologyThis class is designed to allow the student to learn about their own body, God’s ultimate creation. Students completing this course will be able to describe and examine the human body as a composite of interrelated parts; describe and successfully demonstrate the use of tools appropriate to dissection; identify and analyze symptom and treatments of major diseases; and demonstrate how best to care for their own bodies.Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, Martini/ Bartholomew-2007
ScienceMultipleHonors BiologyHonors Biology is a yearlong rigorous course which encompasses the nature of life, ecology, cells, genetics, evolution, microorganisms and fungi, plants, invertebrates, vertebrates, and the human body. Students will be taught science concepts, science skills, lab skills, technical writing (lab reports) and Biblical truths related to these subject areas. The material in this course will be introduced through multiple learning modalities, which include note-taking, critical thinking, hands-on activities, graphs, related projects, and research investigations. This course fulfills the life-science requirement for graduation and prepares the student for further study in AP Biology.Miller, Kenneth R., and Joseph S. Levine. Biology. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2004. Print; Miller, Kenneth R., and Joseph S. Levine. Biology. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2014. Print.
ScienceMultipleHonors ChemistryThis lab-based introductory course is designed to provide students with a challenging, relevant, “hands- on”, and content rich introduction to chemistry. Students are encouraged to develop a thoughtful, systematic approach to problem solving as they apply skills essential to understanding the nature of the experimental sciences. The course is designed to meet and/or exceed the Chemistry Content Standards for the State of California. Advanced math intensive chemistry concepts will be approached from a more qualitative, conceptual framework.World of Chemistry, McDougall Litell/ Houghton Mifflin, 2002
ScienceMultiplePhysicsThis is a two semester lab-based introductory course in general physics covering Newtonian mechanics, waves, electromagnetism, optics, thermodynamics and nuclear physics. Emphasis is placed on the graphical, numerical, and algebraic analysis of experimental data to model real world phenomena and develop insight into core concepts. Students are challenged to implement a thoughtful, systematic approach to problem solving which will equip them to use their factual knowledge as a starting point for developing creative solutions.Holt Physics, Holt, J, Houghton Mifflin and Harcourt, 2009
Soc SciMultipleAP PsychologyThis college-level Psychology course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatments of psychological disorders, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas. The AP Psychology course is designed to be the equivalent of the Introduction to Psychology course usually taken during the first year of college. However, this is more than an AP Course, but a worldview course where we look at the mind and culture through a Biblical Worldview testing every theory with what the Word of God states is true.Psychology – Preparing for the Advanced Placement Examination: AMSCO 2019.
Soc SciMultipleWorld HistoryThis course is to expose students to a wide knowledge-base of Modern World History, starting with a look at the birth of Western Civilization through a study of Greco-Roman history, then a focus on world events after 1492AD. Students will develop the skills necessary for them to be able to comprehend, analyze, evaluate, interpret, and synthesize historical documents. Students will be expected to understand and analyze the historical context of key events, peoples, places, and legacies in modern World History (600BC-Present) and relate them to a wider global context. This will be accomplished through direct instruction, reading of texts including primary and secondary sources, interaction with peers through seminars and projects, and by directed and independent writing assignments. Students will be exposed to historical documents which highlight the interactions between humans and the environment, the development of civilizations, the cooperation and conflicts between cultures, the establishment of empires (development, expansion, and decline), the changes and continuities in social structures, and the enduring legacies still impacting the world. Students will also incorporate habits of mind by using historical evidence to do the following: employ chronological reasoning, adeptly compare civilizations, contextualize information, appropriately interpret primary and secondary sources, and arrive to meaningful and persuasive conclusions.World Civilizations: The Global Experience, 6th ed. Pearson Longman, 2010.
Soc Sci10thAP World HistoryThis college level course is a macro history course which studies the major developments globally from its beginnings to the present, with an emphasis on the key themes of interaction between humans and the environment, development and interaction of cultures, state building, economic systems, and social systems. Special focus is placed on comparing, contrasting, and looking at change over time of civilizations in relation to social, technological, cultural, religious, and political aspects. This class is designed to provide students with the ability to think critically, globally, and provide a Biblical worldview in relation to international issues which have and continue to affect history. The course prepares students to take the AP Exam in the spring by making global connections, developing writing skills, and analyzing primary sources.World History: Patterns of Interaction. McDougall Littell, 2007.
Soc Sci10thUnited States History- c. 1607 to PresentStudents in grade eleven study the major turning points in American history from 1607 to the present. Following a review of the nation’s beginnings and the impact of the Enlightenment and Reformation on U.S. democratic and religious ideals, students build upon the ninth grade study of global industrialization to understand the emergence and impact of new technology and a corporate economy, including the social and cultural effects. They trace the change in the ethnic composition of American society; the movement toward equal rights for racial minorities and women; and the growth of the United States as a major world power. An emphasis is placed on the expanding role of the federal government and federal courts as well as the continuing tension between the individual and the state. Students consider the major social problems of our time and trace their causes in historical events. They learn that the United States has served as a model for other nations and that the rights and freedoms we enjoy are not accidents, but the results of a defined set of political principles that are not always basic to citizens of other countries. Students understand that our rights under the U.S. Constitution are a precious inheritance from God that depends on an educated citizenry for their preservation and protection.United States History: Reconstruction to the Present, Pearson: Boston, 2016
Soc Sci11thAP United States HistoryThis college-level U.S. history survey course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to form a better understanding of American history from its beginnings to the present. It will teach students to assess evidence and interpretations in historical documents. Through analysis, students will be able to develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of informed judgment and persuasively present ideas in writing. While the course’s content is determined by the College Board, U.S. History is also presented through a Biblical worldview. Also, the course is intended to provide students with the historical practices necessary to prepare for the AP Exam in the spring.United States History – Preparing for the Advanced Placement Examination: AMSCO 2018.
Soc Sci12thUS GovernmentThis one-semester course incorporates elements of basic political science, sociology, and world events into a comprehensive study of the U.S. Constitution. Students will analyze the roots of American democracy and discuss how the ideals and principles of the United States have developed and changed over time. Students will also examine state and local governments and address issues relevant to southern California. Students will learn the philosophy, power structure, and processes related to American Federalism that have shaped and continue to shape the American political experience. Students will learn the separation of powers in the United States government and how the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial branches operate. In addition, students will be exposed to current social issues and evaluate and analyze their significance, as well as consider their own personal beliefs and values. Magruders’ American Government, Pearson 2018
Soc Sci12thEconomicsIn this second semester course students will study fundamental economic concepts, applying the tools (graphs, statistics, equations) from other subject areas to the understanding of operations and institutions of economic systems. Studied in a historic context are the basic economic principles of micro- and macroeconomics, international economics, comparative economic systems, measurement, and methods. Students will see how choices by consumers, businesses, and governments influence the world’s economy. Students will explore their role in the economy and develop their ability to make wise financial and economic decisions.Economics: Principles in Action, CA Edition, 2019, Pearson Education, Inc.
Soc Sci12thAP US Government and PoliticsThis year long college level course involves a quarter of Economics and three quarters of AP Government. It contains both the study of general concepts used to interpret United States politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarity with the Multiple institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute United States political reality. This class is designed to establish a foundation for students to better understand the American political system. During the course students will be asked to master key concepts as well as develop a strong political science vocabulary. Students will implement the skills necessary to analyze and synthesize information to arrive at logical, well thought out conclusions from a Biblical worldview. One of the primary goals, aside from preparing for the AP exam, is to motivate student involvement in their government.Wilson, James Q., John J. Dilulio, Jr. American Government: Institutions & Policies. AP, 12th Edition. Boston: Wadsworth Cengage Learning, 2011.
Soc Sci9thWorld History-c. 1492 to ReconstructionThis course focuses on early American history through the Reconstruction era following the Civil War. Events are taught chronologically and include, but are not limited to, early exploration and colonization, the American Revolution, The Mexican-American War, Manifest Destiny, the Civil War and Reconstruction, closing of the frontier, and beginnings of industrialization. Special emphases include civics and California history.World Civilizations: The Global Experience, 6th ed. Pearson Longman, 2010.
Soc8

Family Statement of Faith

  • The Statement of Faith does not exhaust the extent of our beliefs.  The Bible itself, as the inspired, inerrant, plenary, and infallible Word of God that speaks with final authority concerning truth, morality, and the proper conduct of mankind, is the sole and final source of all that we believe.  For purposes of CUSSD’s faith, doctrine, practice, policy, and discipline, Shadow Mountain Community Church is CUSSD’s final interpretive authority on the Bible’s meaning and application.
  • We believe that there is one God eternally existent in three persons: Father, Son and Holy Spirit.
  • We believe in the deity of our Lord Jesus Christ, in His virgin birth, and His sinless life, in His miracles, in His vicarious and atoning death through the shedding of His blood, in His bodily resurrection on the third day, in His ascension to the right hand of the Father, and In His personal pre-millennial return to rapture His Church before the Tribulation and His glorious appearing to set up His Millennial Kingdom.   
  • We believe that salvation is by grace alone through faith, apart from works by the merit of the shed blood of Christ, and that the born-again believer is eternally secure in Christ.
  • We believe in the present ministry of the Holy Spirit by whose indwelling the Christian is enabled to live a godly life.
  • We believe in the resurrection of both the saved and the lost; they that are saved unto the resurrection of life, and they that are lost unto the resurrection of damnation.
  • We believe in the spiritual unity of believers in our Lord Jesus Christ.
  • We believe in the individual priesthood of the believer.
  • We believe life begins at conception.
  • We believe that the term “marriage” has only one meaning; the uniting of one biological man and one biological woman in a single, exclusive union, as delineated in Scripture. (Gen. 2:18-25.)  We believe that God intends sexual intimacy to occur only between a biological man and a biological woman who are married to each other. (1 Cor. 6:18; 7:2-5; Heb. 13:4.)  We believe that God has commanded that no intimate sexual activity be engaged in outside of a marriage between a man and a woman.
  • We believe that the Scripture dictates standards of sexual behavior. The unique roles of the male and female are clearly defined in Scripture. Any promiscuity, homosexuality, gender identity issues or other deviations from Biblical principles is a sin that is offensive to God (Matt. 5:18-19; I Cor. 6: 9-10, 19-20; Eph. 5:3-5; 1 Thess. 4:3-8).

SCHOOL-WIDE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

We expect our students to be:

Influential Christians who:

  • Accept the Lord Jesus Christ as personal Savior.
  • Apply Biblical principles as the foundation for moral and spiritual living.
  • Develop and maintain an informed Biblical worldview that shapes their lifestyle choices.
  • Demonstrate God’s love through acts of service and sharing the gospel.

Investigative Learners who:

  • Master a body of knowledge, vocabulary, and skills.
  • Understand, analyze, and order relationships among facts.
  • Assess their needs and apply appropriate strategies to learn concepts and skills.
  • Actively use the tools of learning throughout their lifetime.

Perceptive Thinkers who:

  • Identify, analyze, discriminate, prioritize, and apply information.
  • Have the ability to solve problems by thinking independently and logically.
  • Make responsible and well-reasoned decisions.
  • Actively seek and apply absolute truths.

Effective Communicators who:

  • Demonstrate the ability to accurately understand, interpret, and exchange information.
  • Communicate with eloquence, creativity, and persuasion in writing and in speech.
  • Develop and utilize artistic expression.
  • Proclaim and defend the gospel with wisdom, wit and respect.

Quality Producers who:

  • Demonstrate a growing knowledge of curriculum.
  • Develop their God-given talents and abilities.
  • Display standards of excellence in all pursuits.
  • Work well with others toward a common goal.

Responsible Citizens who:

  • Respect and submit to authority.
  • Actively protect and promote freedom and democracy.
  • Enjoy God’s creation and live as good stewards within it.
  • Recognize and contribute to meeting the needs of others.    

research links & INformation

Web Research Links:

Grolier Online (includes Encyclopedia Americana)
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EBSCO Host Research Databases – Full-text Periodical and Reference Articles Online
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SIRS Knowledge Source – Periodical articles online
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San Diego County Library Website
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